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The Monday Poem: Little song for the maimed

The Monday Poem: Little song for the maimed

Little song for the maimed

by Benjamin Peret

 

Lend me your arm
To replace my leg
The rats ate it for me
At Verdun
At Verdun
I ate a lot of rats
But they didn’t give me back my leg
And that’s why I was given the Croix de Guerre
And a wooden leg
And a wooden leg
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The Friday Film – Beetlejuice (1988)

The Friday Film – Beetlejuice (1988)

The film Beetlejuice is the home to everyone’s favourite family, the Deetz clan. It’s high on my list of Tim Burton favourites. It was obviously a huge hit and you can even get Beetlejuice Lego!

I’ve watched the film so many times and it delights me with every viewing. The Day-O dinner scene is one of the greatest comedy moments in the history of film.

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To my delight and after months of excruciating waiting, TT Games and Warner Bros. have finally graced us with the Beetlejuice Fun Pack, a box consisting of the ‘Ghost With the Most’ in the flesh, as it were, and one angry Sandworm. As far as the actual toys go, Beetlejuice (or Betelgeuse, to be more accurate) comes outfitted with his signature black-and-white striped suit, ectoplasmic green hair and slightly rotten face. Saturn’s Sandworm also looks surprisingly representative of its counterpart fictional character, only in block form. The wriggly monstrosity can also be remixed into a delightfully Spooky Spider as well as something every creaky manor absolutely needs in its broom closet—a Haunted Vacuum. I mean, how else are you supposed to suck up all those stray spirits? Forbes

There’s also a Beetlejuice stage musical planned! Surely there’s no one as good as Winona Ryder (Beetlejuice was responsible for her teenage fame, along with Edward Scissorhands) to play Lydia, but I’d definitely give it a chance. Keep your eyes peeled.

Only Tim Burtons second full-length feature, it also starred Alec Baldwin, Geena Davis, and Catherine O’Hara. Beetlejuice quickly became a pop culture phenomena and most recently has been brought to life as part of a pop-up themed bar, Beetle House, in Los Angeles. – Forbes

7 Quotes from Hans (Jean) Arp

7 Quotes from Hans (Jean) Arp

Hans when he spoke in German and Jean when in French, either way, Mr Arp had some wise words to share.

 

Jean Arp, reproduced in 391, No. 8, Zurich, February 1919
Jean Arp, reproduced in 391, No. 8, Zurich, February 1919

1.

Hans Arp
Hans Arp

2.

the streams buck like rams in a tent
whips crack and from the hills come the crookedly combed
shadows of the shepherds.
black eggs and fools’ bells fall from the trees.
thunder drums and kettledrums beat upon the ears of the donkeys.
wings brush against flowers.
fountains spring up in the eyes of the wild boar.

– Dada poetry lines from his poem ‘Der Vogel Selbdritt‘, Jean / Hans Arp – first published in 1920; as quoted in Gesammelte Gedichte I (transl. Herbert Read), p. 41

3.

Hans Arp
Hans Arp

4.

As the thought comes to me to exorcise and transform this black with a white drawing, it has already become a surface.. .Now I have lost all fear, and begin to draw on the black surface.

– Hans Arp’s quote on drawing on the black surface; as quoted in Search for the Real, Hans Hofmann, Addison Gallery of modern Art, 1948

5.

Soon silence will have passed into legend. Man has turned his back on silence. Day after day he invents machines and devices that increase noise and distract humanity from the essence of life, contemplation, meditation.

6.
Hans Arp
Hans Arp

7.

I hereby declare that on February 8th, 1916, Tristan Tzara discovered the word DADA. I was present with my twelve children when Tzara pronounced for the first time this word which has aroused in us such legitimate enthusiasm. This took place at the Café Terrasse in Zurich, and I wore a brioche in my left nostril. I am convinced that this word has no importance and that only imbeciles and Spanish professors can be interested in dates. What interests us is the Dada spirit and we were all Dada before the existence of Dada. The first Holy Virgins I painted date from 1886, when I was a few months old and amused myself by pissing graphic impressions. The morality of idiots and their belief in geniuses makes me shit.

– ‘Declaration’, Jean (Hans) Arp, October 1921

Born 16 September 1886
Strasbourg, German Empire
Died 7 June 1966 (aged 79)
Basel, Switzerland
Nationality German-French
Education Académie Julian
Known for Sculpture, painting
Poetry at Literati — “Aime Cesaire & the Art of Translation” — Clayton Eshleman & Keith Taylor

Poetry at Literati — “Aime Cesaire & the Art of Translation” — Clayton Eshleman & Keith Taylor

On September 13, 2017, Literati Bookstore in Ann Arbor, Michigan hosted Clayton Eshleman & Keith Taylor in celebration of Eshleman & A. James Arnold’s landmark “Complete Poetry of Aime Cesaire,” the definitive translation of Cesaire’s work into the English language.

Review: The 100-Pound Gangster by Henry Lin

Review: The 100-Pound Gangster by Henry Lin

Henry Lin spent most of his precocious youth involved with the international criminal underworld. By the age of fourteen, he was involved with a notorious San Francisco triad with links to Hong Kong and mainland China, and by the age of eighteen, he had seen, and done, more than most will in a lifetime. Unsure of himself and his place in the world, he fought to survive and earn respect from his peers. But when he learned that his grandfather was a high-ranking member of the Chinese Secret Service, and was one of the most powerful and well-connected men in China until his death a few years before, Henry discovered that he was descended from a kind of underworld aristocracy. – Blurb

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The 100-Pound Gangster by Henry Lin

This is a really interesting and gripping memoir. Henry Lin tells us stories from his life, from childhood to his late twenties. The tales are brutal, sad and shocking, as you’d expect from the premise of the book.

The most interesting parts of The 100-Pound Gangster for me, were the stories of incarceration, wether in juvenile detention centres, prisons or “reform” schools. Lin describes these experiences well, speaking truthfully about his fears and emotions.

I do wish the book was a bit more linear. We jump back and forth in time for no apparent reason and I found this a little frustrating at times. But overall, it’s a fascinating read.

I give The 100-Pound Gangster 4/5.