Light Dawning by Ty Arthur

Following his sci-fi novella “Empty” from 2016, Ty Arthur returns with new full-length horror novel “Light Dawning.” Pivoting away from the emptiness of space, the book dives headlong into the waters of fantasy, but with a seriously grimdark twist. This next foray into the bleaker corners of human existence drops this week on Kindle and paperback.

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Like its predecessor, the creation of “Light Dawning” was driven forward by the power of music, with special thanks in particular  due to U.K. avant-garde black metal group Code, Norwegian musical enigma Ihsahn, and Chilean prog rock group Bauda. To get an advance preview of the themes and tone of the novel, a music playlist matching several scenes can be heard via Spotify.

Once known as the City on the Hill and revered far and wide for its independence and boundless opportunity, Cestia has become home only to the damned. Surviving under the brutal occupation of a southern empire for three long years, the oppressed populace has lost hope of liberation, turning instead towards an increasingly desperate rebellion willing to commit any atrocity for a chance at freedom.

Brushstroke Picture Frame: https://www.tuxpi.com/photo-effects/brushstroke-photo-frame

As total war approaches, four lost souls trapped behind Cestia’s walls are on a collision course with fate, destined to either save the city or see it utterly destroyed while calling on forces beyond mankind’s comprehension. For good or ill, the light of a new day is about to dawn.

Brushstroke Picture Frame: https://www.tuxpi.com/photo-effects/brushstroke-photo-frame

“As with all my work, this story is inspired by a real life experience translated into a fictional setting, and completing this book took a lot out of me,” Arthur said of the upcoming release. “Its set in an unquestionably fantasy universe, but you won’t find any elves or farm boy chosen ones saving the world. My take on the genre draws more from cosmic dread and the horror of war than anything with unlikely heroes or lovable rogues. Don’t expect any happy endings.”

For a taste of what to expect from the novel, the full first chapter can be read here.

AUTHOR BIO

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Ty Arthur gets to meld his passions with his work while freelancing for the likes of Metalunderground and GameSkinny. His debut sci-fi / horror novella “Empty” was released in early 2016, with many more dark tales still to come. Arthur writes to exorcise his demons and lives in the cold, dark north with his amazing wife Megan and infant son Gannicus Picard.

Brushstroke Picture Frame: https://www.tuxpi.com/photo-effects/brushstroke-photo-frame

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The Wednesday Painting – Frieda and Diego Rivera (1931) by Frieda Kahlo

Kahlo

This week’s Wednesday painting is Mexican painter Frieda Kahlo’s Frieda and Diego Rivera.

Frieda and Diego Rivera by Frieda Kahlo

Frieda and Diego Rivera by Frieda Kahlo

Medium: oil on canvas

Dimensions: 39 3/8 in. x 31 in. (100.01 cm x 78.74 cm)

Initially Diego Rivera (1886-1957) was the big celebrity in this painting, but of course Frieda (1907-1954) has gone on to become somewhat of a superstar in the art world. It is well-known that Kahlo suffered with chronic pain throughout her life as a result of contracting polio as a child and from being in a severe bus crash when she was eighteen.

His retrospective at the young Museum of Modern Art was only the institution’s second devoted to a single figure. The first was Matisse. His wife, 25, was a brash near-unknown. The two had ejected themselves from the Mexican Communist Party in 1929, but were still celebrity radicals, given to blustery anti-capitalist talk and mercurial symbolic gestures… As he had been everywhere he went on his US tour, Rivera was wined and dined in Detroit. ArtNet

#anticapitalist, #art, #crash, #diegorivera, #fridakahlo, #kahlo, #matisse, #mexican, #moma, #oil, #pain, #rivera, #selfportrait

As Far as They Had Got – A “Follow-My-Leader” Story

I just read a very silly story by E. Phillips Oppenheim (1866-1946), William Pett Ridge (1859–1930), Arthur Morrison (1863-1945), Horace Annesley Vachell (1861–1955), Barry Pain (1864-1928), Charles Andrew Garvice (1850-1920) and Richard Marsh (1857-1915). It was originally published in The Strand magazine.

In our May number we published an article entitled “A ‘Follow-my Leader’ Picture,” and in the following pages the same method is applied to the writing of a story, with an extremely interesting result. The story was opened by Mr. E. Phillips Oppenheim, who alone of the contributors was not required to have a complete story outlined in his mind. This opening was then sent to Mr. Pett Ridge, who wrote the next chapter, and also sent a brief statement of the manner in which he thought the whole story might have been completed. These two chapters were then sent on to Mr. Arthur Morrison, who, in the same manner, added his instalment and his idea of the whole story: and so on, chapter by chapter, till the whole was completed. It should, of course, be remembered that each writer had before him merely the preceding chapters of the story, and knew nothing whatever of his predecessors’ proposed methods of ending it. These explanations are given as footnotes to each chapter, and will be found most interesting as throwing light upon the methods of work of the various eminent fiction-writers, and the way in which a story evolves itself in such widely divergent manners in different minds.

I’m not a writer by any means, but if anyone would like to try a project like this, by all means get in touch (jamiesnelling@gmail.com or comment below) and I’ll get it set up!

#arthurmorrison, #chapters, #comment, #ephillipsoppenheim, #fiction, #followmyleader, #footnotes, #methods, #minds, #morrison, #oppenheim, #pain, #pett, #project, #published, #remembered, #ridge, #story, #thestrand, #writer