Leonora Carrington – Top 10 Quotes

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Leonora Carrington was one of the lesser known figures of the 1930’s Surrealist movement. She was born in the UK but spent most of her life in Mexico and died there in 2011.

Leonora Carrington was briefly married to Mexican poet and journalist Renato Leduc. Some of her more famous visual pieces are The Giantess, The Meal of Lord Candlestick, Portrait of Max Ernst, Adieu Ammenotep and The Artist Traveling Incognito.

  1. You may not believe in magic but something very strange is happening at this very moment. Your head has dissolved into thin air and I can see the rhododendrons through your stomach. It’s not that you are dead or anything dramatic like that, it is simply that you are fading away and I can’t even remember your name.
    Leonora Carrington, The Hearing Trumpet 2000
  2. Reason must know the heart’s reasons and every other reason
    Leonora Carrington
  3. 1366489-Leonora-Carrington-Quote-I-ve-always-had-access-to-other-worlds-We
  4. Do you believe, she went on, that the past dies?Yes, said Margaret. Yes, if the present cuts its throat.
    Leonora Carrington, The Seventh Horse And Other Tales tout_small_9_Leonora_Carrington_INT-el_mundo_magico_maya
  5. There are things that are not sayable. That’s why we have art.
  6. the-task-of-the-right-eye-is-to-peer-into-the-telescope
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  8. I never eat meat as I think it is wrong to deprive animals of their life when they are so difficult to chew anyway
    Leonora Carrington maxresdefault-1
  9. Houses are really bodies. We connect ourselves with walls, roofs, and objects just as we hang on to our livers, skeletons, flesh and bloodstream. I am no beauty, no mirror is necessary to assure me of this absolute fact. Nevertheless I have a death grip on this haggard frame as if it were the limpid body of Venus herself.
    ― Leonora Carrington, The Hearing Trumpet
  10. Leonara-Carrington-Painting-is-a-need-not-a-choice.

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Leonora Carrington – Top 10 Facts

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Above: Picture of the sculpture “Stallion” on display at the Estacion Indianilla museum in Mexico City, on April 14, 2011 as part of the exhibition of Mexican sculptor Leonora Carrington. (Getty)

Leonora Carrington was a fantastic surrealist artist and weird fiction author. Here are ten facts you need to know.

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  1. She Was a Founding Member of the Women’s Liberation Movement in Mexico
  2. Carrington was raised in a wealthy Roman Catholic family on a large estate called Crookhey Hall.
  3. She died May 25 2011 at the age of 94, and was one of the last surviving participants in the Surrealist movement of the 1930s.
  4. She remained active as a painter and sculptor throughout her life, and continued to inspire younger generations.
  5. Two weeks after her death an international group of Surrealists met in Athens to explore her proposal for “Surrealist survival kits”.
  6. She had fallen in love with the 46-year-old, married, surrealist painter Max Ernst. She intended to move to Paris with him and pursue a career as an artist.The Guardian
  7. Leonora Carrington was a revolutionary before she ever encountered the Surrealists. Born into an upper class family in Lancashire, England, Leonora learned at a very early age the injustice of society.Illinois.edu
  8. Finally after many rebellious acts and expulsions from school, she succeeded in convincing her parents to let her study art at the Amédée Ozenfant Academy in London.
  9. He (Ernst) left his wife for Carrington, his “Bride of the Wind”. The couple lived together until the outbreak of W.W.II when Ernst was taken prisoner as an enemy alien. Carrington’s work during this period moves from themes of childhood filled with magical birds and animals, to a mature art based on Celtic mythology and alchemical transformation. It is an art of sensibility rather than hallucination, one in which animal guides lead the way out of a world of men who don’t know magic, fear the night, and have no mental powers except intellect. Illinois.edu
  10. “The source of Carringtion’s magical white horse lies not in Freud’s use of the horse as a symbol of male power but in the Celtic legends that nourished her childhood…the horse is sacred to the ancient tribe of the Tuatha de Danaan…the hyena belongs to the fertile world of night; the horse becomes an image of rebirth into the light of day and the world beyond the looking glass. As symbolic intermediaries between the unconscious and the natural world, they replace male Surrealists’ reliance on the image of woman as the mediating link between man and the “marvelous” and suggest the powerful role played by Nature as a source of creative power for the woman artist (Chadwick, p. 79).”

Anthology of Black Humour