The Monday Poem – 10 november xxxv by Pablo Picasso

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This week’s poem is Picasso’s 10 november xxxv. I hope you enjoy it!

Pablo Picasso (25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. Regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore.Wikipedia

10 november XXXV
on the dining room table above a colossal carpet color of dry blood the ashtray
packed with butt-ends looked just like a little death’s head that stuck out its tongue at
me today this very night november tenth a quarter after ten by now which with three
more should make eleven by the clock which then will strike the hour

 

Doodle Tuesday – Louise Bourgeois

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This week’s doodle comes from Feminist Surrealist (not officially either) Louise Bourgeois (1911-2010). Probably most well-known for her cells (below) and giant spiders, Bourgeois’ sketches always hit me the hardest.

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Above: Sculpture by Bourgeois in theDomestic Incidents group exhibit at London’s Tate Modern Turbine Hall, 2006

I think I’m ready to say that she’s my favourite artist now. Or at least that she ties with John Cage. Yes, I don’t think they’d mind sharing. They’re both so inspirational.

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Born Louise Josephine Bourgeois
25 December 1911
Paris, France
Died 31 May 2010 (aged 98)
Manhattan, New York City, U.S.

Her mother’s death inspired her to abandon mathematics and to begin studying art. Her father thought modern artists were wastrels and refused to support her. Good old Wikipedia

The Monday Poem – The Sentences as Girl whose of Friendly Come to

It’s time for the Monday Poem 🙂 I hope you enjoy it.

The Sentences as Girl whose of Friendly Come to – a fluxus chance poem

 

Or way that

from before but

lost

an account that move.

But if

thought about

prize and

as exhilarating because emerges is disjunction between

communicated with we should suggested a small-c conservative.

Which he

was not unknown in the 1890s,

politics.

Became

child benefit age,

and took with Stalin’s Russia

like it

looked mind.

A good book about a remarkable man,

which scoundrels take refuge:

all sides in of

of

from

the garter.

That their own good-natured

a

first and.

Sticklers will

will wonder

like a wooden

the book.

Very

 

-a chance poem by Jay S

 

Charles Hartman discusses several methods of automatic generation of poetry in his book The Virtual Muse. Good old Wikipedia

fluxus chance poetry

5 Days of Photography. 5: Philippe Halsman (1906-1979)

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It’s the final day of 5 Days of Photography and I’m finishing as I began; with an oldie. Day 5 is Latvian-American artist Philippe Halsman, responsible for that photo of Einstein and producing work for Vogue and Life magazines. Dabbling in photography from the age of fifteen, Halsman went on to become one of the world’s most recognised photographers, working with subjects such as Marilyn Monroe and Richard Nixon.

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“I realised that deep underneath people wanted to jump and considered jumping fun” – Philippe Halsman

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He exhibited his work several times at the avant-garde Pléiade gallery alongside other photographers including Man Ray, André Kertész, Brassaï and Laure Albin Guillot. When Germany invaded France in 1940, Halsman’s prosperous career came to an end and he fled to New York with his family. There he would work for numerous American magazines including Life, the first magazine illustrated solely with photos… In all he shot 101 covers for Life magazine.
But Philippe Halsman was far from being just a celebrity photographer. In fact he experimented his whole life long, pushing back the boundaries of his chosen medium. For more than 30 years he worked in close collaboration with Salvador Dalí and invented ‘jumpology’, which consisted in taking photos of famous people jumping as a way of obtaining more natural and spontaneous pictures of his subjects.
Philippe Halsman stands out by the wide range of his activities: portraits, fashion, reportage, advertising, personal projects, as well as private and institutional commissions. Halsman’s photography is characterised by a direct approach, a high level of technical mastery and attention to detail. 
L’oeil de la Photographie

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Born to a Jewish family of Morduch (Maks) Halsman, a dentist, and Ita Grintuch, a grammar school principal, in Riga, Halsman studied electrical engineering in Dresden. In September 1928, 22-year-old Halsman was falsely accused of his father’s murder while they were on a hiking trip in the Austrian Tyrol, an area rife with antisemitism. After a trial based on circumstantial evidence he was sentenced to four years of prison… He was pardoned and released in 1930.[1] Halsman consequently left Austria for France. He began contributing to fashion magazines such as Vogue and soon gained a reputation as one of the best portrait photographers in France, renowned for images that were sharp rather than in soft focus as was often used, and closely cropped. When France was invaded by Germany, Halsman fled to Marseille. He eventually managed to obtain a U.S. visa[citation needed], aided by family friend Albert Einstein (whom he later famously photographed in 1947). Halsman had his first success in America when the cosmetics firm Elizabeth Arden used his image of model Constance Ford against the American flag in an advertising campaign for “Victory Red” lipstick. A year later, in 1942, he found work with Life magazine, photographing hat designs; a portrait of a model in a Lilly Daché hat was the first of his many covers for Life… In 1951 Halsman was commissioned by NBC to photograph various popular comedians of the time including Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, Groucho Marx, and Bob Hope. While photographing the comedians doing their acts, he captured many of the comedians in mid-air, which went on to inspire many later jump pictures of celebrities including the Ford family, The Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Marilyn Monroe, María Félix and Richard Nixon… His 1961 book Halsman on the Creation of Photographic Ideas, discussed ways for photographers to produce unusual pieces of work by following six rules:

“the rule of the direct approach,”
“the rule of the unusual technique,”
“the rule of the added unusual feature,”
“the rule of the missing feature,”
“the rule of compounded features,”
“the rule of the literal or ideographic method.”

In his first rule, Halsman explains that being straightforward and plain creates a strong photograph. To make an ordinary and uninteresting subject interesting and unusual, his second rule lists a variety of photographic techniques, including unusual lighting, unusual angle, unusual composition, etc. The rule of the added unusual feature is an effort by the photographer to capture the audiences attention by drawing their eye to something unexpected by introducing an unusual feature or prop into the photograph. For example, the photograph of a little boy holding a hand grenade by Diane Arbus contains what Halsman would call an added unusual feature. – Wikipedia


Please note that Examining the Odd does not condone the throwing of cats, no matter how wonderful an artist you are.