Leonora Carrington – Top 10 Quotes

1. “Military people never seem to apologize for killing each other yet novelists feel ashamed for writing some nice inert paper book that is not certain to be read by anybody.”


2. “People under seventy and over seven are very unreliable if they are not cats.”
The Hearing Trumpet


 

3. “Do you believe, she went on, that the past dies?
Yes, said Margaret. Yes, if the present cuts its throat.”
The Seventh Horse And Other Tales


 

4. Screen Shot 2018-10-31 at 16.16.12

5. “One has to be careful what one takes when one goes away forever.”
The Hearing Trumpet


 

6. “The task of the right eye is to peer into the telescope, while the left eye peers into the microscope.”


7. “I do miss England. Well, I miss the idea of England, I think. But I haven’t been back for years. I probably just miss the past.”


8. “There are things that are not sayable. That’s why we have art.”

9. “I do not know of any religion that does not declare women to be feeble-minded, unclean, generally inferior creatures to males, although most Humans assume that we are the cream of all species. Women, alas; but thank God, Homo Sapiens! Most of us, I hope, are now aware that a woman should not have to demand Rights. The Rights were there from the beginning; they must be Taken Back Again, including the Mysteries which were ours and which were violated, stolen or destroyed, leaving us with the thankless hope of pleasing a male animal, probably of one’s own species.”


10. “I had no idea what maternal instinct was until I had my children.”

Beyond the Wall of Sleep is one of H.P. Lovecraft‘s greatest short stories. It begins with a quote from Shakespeare: “I have an exposition of sleep come upon me.” It then goes into a wonderful mini-essay on the nature of dreams.

Whilst the greater number of our nocturnal visions are perhaps no more than faint and fantastic reflections of our waking experiences—Freud to the contrary with his puerile symbolism—there are still a certain remainder whose immundane and ethereal character permits of no ordinary interpretation, and whose vaguely exciting and disquieting effect suggests possible minute glimpses into a sphere of mental existence no less important than physical life, yet separated from that life by an all but impassable barrier. – H.P. Lovecraft

I think this is why it’s one of my favourite Lovecraft stories – there must be more to dreaming than we know. Do we really go somewhere else when we dream? Can we connect with other people and other beings?

From those blurred and fragmentary memories we may infer much, yet prove little.

Sometimes I believe that this less material life is our truer life, and that our vain presence on the terraqueous globe is itself the secondary or merely virtual phenomenon.

I found this incredible music which I believe is based on the story. It’s beautiful and eerie – well worth a listen! There’s a nine minute track which you can listen to for free.

Read the full story here.

Beyond the Wall of Sleep – H.P. Lovecraft

The Gentleness & Vulgarity of ‘Crimes of Passion’

Kathleen-Turner-Crimes-of-Passion

I only got round to seeing Crimes of Passion… yesterday. Yes, yesterday. My excuse – I was minus two when the film was released. Crimes of Passion moves between a seemingly confident prostitute and Bobby, a generic man whose marriage is failing. In order to make some more money to keep Amy (the wife) happy, Bobby takes on some extra night work conducting surveillance on a woman – Joanna Crane (Kathleen Turner) – at the behest of Joanna’s employer. Cult Reviews

“Yikes!” – Kathleen Turner’s response to the mention of Ken Russell. I can’t imagine he was an easy man to work with – perhaps a little like working with Dennis Potter? A man who liked everything in excess.

In fact, Russell’s excessive style is strikingly similar to that of classic Hollywood melodrama, a connection that, despite its importance for understanding this filmmaker’s work, seems strangely unexplored. – from Ken Russell: Re-Viewing England’s Last Manneristedited by Kevin M. Flanagan

“I truly believe that he is a genius. But he was a genius that had to shoot himself in the foot. He wanted to be a hugely successful Hollywood director. But he also wanted to prove that he wasn’t Hollywood, so that meant doing a few awful things to his work… It was complicated making that film.” – Turner

Crimes of Passion (1984) was directed by Ken Russell and written by Barry Sandler. Turner reportedly slept for a whole day once the filming had finished. I got on the first plane home. My fiancee picked me up at the airport and 22 hours later he woke me up and said, “If you don’t wake up I’m taking you to the hospital.” – Kathleen Turner, who played the torn, powerful and pitiful lead role of China Blue/Joanna brilliantly. I was slightly distracted during the second half of the film once I realised that Turner voiced Jessica Rabbit.

Rabbit-wives aside, I really enjoyed this film and I can only imagine how I would have received it as an adult in the eighties. It’s more sophisticated than The Lair of the White Worm, on a par with Gothic and, although more mainstream, I found it easier to watch than the wonderfully surreal Altered States.

Crimes of Passion Clip from 1984 – China Blue (Kathleen Turner) with a customer.

Remembering Eddard Stark (spoilers)

It’s been years since I finished the books, I’m expecting season five on DVD next week and of course season six airs next month… that’s a lot of waiting. So, I decided to reminisce about the good old days; when Ned was around. Besides, people are talking about him again now, questioning what he really got up to all those years before chapter/episode one…

Eddard Stark
Eddard Stark

Why “He dreamt an old dream, of three knights in white cloaks, and a tower long fallen, and Lyanna in her bed of blood” is a big deal for the HBO series… The sentence makes little sense to the casual Thrones viewer, but for many fans, it means everything — and soon, it’ll matter to everyone. The Hollywood Reporter

HBO
HBO

Ned values the life of his children above his own honor and glory. It makes sense that he would allow the world to believe that he was once an unfaithful husband if it meant protecting his family. Tech Insider

s1e1 robert baratheon and ned game of thrones

“The winters are hard, but the Starks will endure. We always have.” – Eddard Stark

MI0001587896

Known for their odd comedy songs and surreal covers of rag-time tracks, The Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band started out on the hit 60s show Do Not Adjust Your Set (a precursor to what would later become Monty Python’s Flying Circus), alongside Eric Idle, Michael Palin, David Jason (amazingly, the most popular cast member at the time), Denise Coffey and Terry Jones. The show even included cut-out animation from the wonderful Terry Gilliam in the second series. It basically consisted of a group of twenty-somethings having fun and being silly. Although these co-stars went on to become far bigger than The Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, many believe that they were the true, weird stars of the show; hilarious, but with real musical talent. For those of us not old enough to remember the original broadcast, I’d love to see DNAYS aired again! We’re ready for the madness… Ok, I found it on Amazon for £2.42 – it’s mine!

The original lead singer from the band was the late Vivian Stanshall, a comedy genius. These days, Rodney “Rhino” Desborough Slater, Sam Spoons and Roger Ruskin Spear tour with pianist David Glasson as Three Bonzos and a Piano.

Anyway, I thought I’d round up my list of their top 5 strangest songs and list them here for you to discover/re-discover. So in no particular order…

  1. Shirt from the Tadpoles album. It starts with the sound of munching… I don’t need to say anything else.

2. Dr. Jazz also from Tadpoles. An usual track for the band as it’s instrumental.

3. Keynsham from the album of the same name. Cling-cling the ring, clang-clang, she sang…

4. Tent – just a little creepy…

5. and finally… Death Cab for Cutie. Just lovely.

The Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band – top 5 strangest songs